U.S. Natural Gas Facts and Statistics

eserves

  • U.S. proved gas reserves (wet) totaled 255.035 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2008, up 2.9% from the 2007 figure. The 2007 number had increased 12.4% from the 2006 figure, which had risen 3.3% from 2005’s level.
  • As of 2008, the top 10 states/areas for proved gas reserves in the U.S. include Texas (81.843 Tcf); Wyoming (32.399 Tcf); Colorado (24.169 Tcf); Oklahoma (22.113 Tcf); New Mexico (17.347 Tcf); the Federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico (13.187 Tcf); Louisiana (11.816 Tcf); Alaska (7.766 Tcf); Utah (6.714 Tcf); and Arkansas (5.628 Tcf).
  • U.S. proved gas reserves are now 43.6% higher than they were in 1990, 20 years ago.
  • Shale gas plays (as in Texas, Louisiana, Pennsylvania and Arkansas) have contributed significantly to gains in U.S. gas reserves in recent years.

Production



 
  • In 2009, the U.S. produced 21.893 Tcf of gas (marketed production), up 3.1% from the 2008 figure. Previously, U.S. output grew 5.2% in 2008, increased 4.0% in 2007 and was up 2.6% in 2006.
  • The 2009 output figure was the highest in 36 years, since 1973. In that year, U.S. gas production was 22.648 Tcf.
  • The top 10 gas-producing states/areas in the U.S. during 2009 included Texas (6.851 Tcf); the Federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico (2.433 Tcf); Wyoming (2.359 Tcf); Oklahoma (1.858 Tcf); New Mexico (1.404 Tcf); Louisiana (1.532 Tcf); Colorado (1.389Tcf); Arkansas (0.447 Tcf); Utah (0.434 Tcf); and Kansas (0.374 Tcf).
  • Across the U.S., the number of producing gas wells was roughly 496,000 in 2009, up 3.6% from the 2008 figure.
  • Over the 20 years from 1989 to 2009,  the number of U.S. gas-producing wells rose 82.3%.
  • During the 20 years from 1989 to 2009, average gas well productivity has fallen 36.3%. It takes a far greater number of wells to achieve the same production levels compared to 1989.
  • Given the trend in gas production, consumption and gas well productivity, the industry will be required to drill a large number of new gas wells at an accelerated pace, if the country’s output and reserves are to grow further.

Consumption

  • U.S. gas consumption (deliveries to consumers) in 2009 was 20.844 Tcf, down 2.4% from the 2008 figure. If lease and plant fuel, and pipeline requirements are added in, then consumption was 22.740 Tcf, down 2.7%. 
  • The 2009 consumer consumption figure includes 6.888 Tcf (33.0% of the national total) for electricity generation, 6.091 Tcf (29.2%) for industrial purposes, 4.739 Tcf (22.7%) for direct residential purposes, and 3.095 Tcf (14.8%) for direct commercial usage.
  • Texas leads the nation in natural gas consumption (volumes delivered to consumers) with 2.933 Tcf in 2009. The rest of the top 10 states includes California (2.245 Tcf); Louisiana (1.200 Tcf); New York (1.136 Tcf); Illinois (0.934 Tcf); Florida (0.925 Tcf); Pennsylvania (0.756 Tcf); Ohio (0.715 Tcf); Michigan (0.694 Tcf); and New Jersey (0.622 Tcf).
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